Pericles

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Cheek by Jowl, Silk Street Theatre

Photo by Patrick Baldwin

Photo by Patrick Baldwin

 

Much like Pericles, this production was me washing up on unknown shores – I knew very little about the play before walking in the room, and not much about the production either – except for the fact it was in French…

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Triumph not in my woes

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I have been relatively quiet of late – for which I apologise. Both personal and professional dramas (not all bad – but all stressful) have been curtailing my available time and energy to post over the last six months at least. As thing begin to ease somewhat, I find myself musing on the nature of triumph and disaster – and those famous lines of Kipling’s:

If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster,

And treat those two impostors just the same

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Julius Caesar (2)

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Bridge Theatre

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Photograph by Manuel Harlan

I have a lot of thoughts about this production – mainly about how damned exciting the theatre can be when a bunch of talented actors and stage professionals get together with the deliberate intention of rabble-rousing, and when they have the extraordinary flexibility of a new theatre at their disposal.

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Beware the ides of March.

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I hope you have a better day than poor old Caesar did! I took the opportunity, when recently in Rome, to wander round his stomping ground – the Forum, the actual Rostrum where Mark Anthony made his famous speech (sadly sans ships’ prows), some of the earliest Republican temples in the city. And I’ve thrown in a contemporaneous portrait of the man himself…

All’s Well that Ends Well

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Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

First Folio-All's Well That Ends Well.jpg

This is one of Shakespeare’s plays I have been more sceptical about – it seems hard to me to get behind a female lead, full of agency as she is, who effectively forces a man into marriage (twice!), or to get behind a man, wronged as he is, whose major character notes are rudeness and lechery. But the Globe managed to bring together a set of wonderfully flawed, real people, with a depth of love and friendship outside the lead romance, and hope that maybe they would all be better for their experiences. All might actually be well after all.

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